Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Sanborn Day Services Talk

Last week, HDPT's Ed Harding, PTA presented to the staff of our Wakefield neighbor, Sanborn Day Services, on techniques to safely transfer patients.

Whether you are looking for a supportive living community or home care services, Sanborn Place, Home Care & Day Services offer an array of services for one to age in a place they call home. Sanborn Place is a supportive living community for the elderly and/or those with disabilities, located in Reading, MA. Sanborn Home Care is the sister corporation to Sanborn Place, dedicated to providing high quality home care services to the elderly and/or disabled. Sanborn Adult Day Services, located in Wakefield, MA, services both the residents of Sanborn Place and the outlying communities.





 

Friday, August 23, 2013

Happy Birthday to HDPT's Ed Harding

HD Physical Therapy's Ed Harding, PTA celebrates his 40th birthday this Friday, August 23, 2013. Stop in the clinic to wish him the best! #40isthenew30 #EdHarding


Wednesday, August 21, 2013

It’s National Senior Citizens Day! With people living and working longer, it’s increasingly important that we recognize the importance of supporting senior citizens in our society. Senior Citizens Day is an opportunity to acknowledge the long-term contribution and dedication of older people, and to ensure that we’re doing our best to give back to them.

At HDPT we are committed to the health and happiness of all of our patients. Everyday we work to restore each person's maximal function with consistency and compassion. Offering distinctive, inventive and proven rehabilitation treatment, our devoted professionals strive to deliver a successful and enjoyable experience to every patient we meet. HDPT proudly serves the communities of Wakefield, Reading, North Reading, Wilmington, Lynnfield, Saugus, Melrose, Peabody, Stoneham, the North Shore, and Essex County, Massachusetts.
 
For more information on HD Physical Therapy, call us at 781-587-0776 or visit www.HDPTonline.com. 

 

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

HD PHYSICAL THERAPY Celebrates August’s National Golf Month

HD PHYSICAL THERAPY Celebrates August’s National Golf Month
Play it Safe on the Course

HD Physical Therapy celebrates August’s National Golf Month by offering tips on how to play it safe and protect yourself on the course. Many golfing-related injuries are results of poor mechanics or overuse, particularly in golfers who are new to the game or do not play often. Although golf is not a contact sport, it does put significant demands on your body, which can easily lead to golf injuries. Follow these tips from the Mayo Clinic and stay safe on the course.

Adjust your swing

Understanding the mechanics behind your golf swing can help you prevent golf injuries:

  • Use proper posture. Think about your posture before and during your swing. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and distribute your weight equally on both feet. Avoid hunching over the ball, which may contribute to neck and back strain.
  • Stay smooth. The power of a golf swing comes from force transferred smoothly through all the muscle groups, from your ankles to your wrists. If you depend on one part of your body for your hitting power, you may be more prone to injuries. For example, overemphasizing your wrists during your swing can lead to golfer's elbow — a strain of the muscles on the inside of the forearm.
  • Don't over swing. If you swing the club too hard or too fast, you may stress your joints. Relax and take a nice, easy swing at the ball. The best golfers have consistent — not necessarily fast — swing tempos.

 

Other tips to keep you on the course

There's more to golf than your golf swing. Consider other ways to lower your risk of golf injuries:

  • Warm up. Before you practice your golf swing or play a round of golf, warm up with a brisk walk or a set of jumping jacks. Stretch your hands, wrists, forearms, elbows, shoulders, spine and pelvis. Swing your golf club a few times, gradually increasing your range of motion.
  • Start slowly. You might practice your swing for hours, believing it's helping your game — but if your body isn't conditioned for the strain, practicing your golf swing may do more harm than good. Work up to your desired level of activity instead.
  • Strengthen your muscles. You don't need bulging muscles to hit a long drive — but the stronger your muscles, the greater your club speed. Better yet, stronger muscles are less prone to golf injuries. For best results, do strength-training exercises year-round.
  • Focus on flexibility. Regular stretching can improve your range of motion and lead to a more fluid golf swing.
  • Build up your endurance. Regular aerobic activity can give you staying power on the course. Try walking, jogging, bicycling or swimming.
  • Lift and carry clubs carefully. Golfers who carry their own bags have higher rates of shoulder and back injuries than do other golfers. If you jerk heavy clubs out of the trunk of your car, you could injure yourself before you reach the first tee. Use proper lifting technique: Keep your back straight and use the strength of your legs to lift.
  • Choose proper footwear. Dress for comfort and protection from the elements. Wear golf shoes with short cleats. Long cleats dig into the sod and hold your feet planted as you swing, which may strain your knees or ankles.

Whether golf is a new interest or a lifelong passion, make the most of your time on the course by protecting yourself from golf injuries. For more information on ways to lower your risk of golf injuries, contact HD Physical Therapy at 781-587-0776 or visit www.HDPTonline.com.

At HDPT we are committed to the health and happiness of our patients. Everyday we work to restore each person's maximal function with consistency and compassion. Offering distinctive, inventive and proven rehabilitation treatment, our devoted professionals strive to deliver a successful and enjoyable experience to every patient we meet. HDPT proudly serves the communities of Wakefield, Reading, North Reading, Wilmington, Lynnfield, Saugus, Melrose, Peabody, Stoneham, the North Shore, and Essex County, Massachusetts.

Friday, August 16, 2013

HD Physical Therapy’s Ed Harding Honored as Wakefield Rotary Paul Harris Fellow


HD Physical Therapy’s Ed Harding was honored as a Rotary International Paul Harris Fellow for his work with the Wakefield club’s polar plunge campaign to end polio.

The award is named after Paul Harris, the Chicago, IL attorney who founded Rotary International in 1905.

Individuals who have contributed more than $1000 to The Rotary Foundation are recognized as Paul Harris Fellows. Additionally, individual Rotary clubs may honor individuals as Paul Harris Fellows. These honorees, like Ed, are individ
uals who meet high professional and personal standards set forth by Paul Harris.

When a person is recognized as a Paul Harris Fellow, they are presented with a Certificate signed by the Rotary International President and the Chairman of the Trustees of The Rotary Foundation, and a lapel pin and medallion.


Monday, August 12, 2013

HD Physical Therapy Announces New Team Members

HD Physical Therapy Announces New Team Members

HD Physical Therapy announces it has enhanced its services by adding two new therapists to the HDPT family. Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC, has joined the practice as a Physical Therapist Assistant and Christine Cunha, DPT as a new Physical Therapist.

“We welcome Svet and Christine to the HDPT family. I am confident that they will increase our ability to provide better care to even more people,” says Glenn R. D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, President & co-founder of HD Physical Therapy. “I am looking forward to working with both Svet and Christine each day, as well as nurturing their ongoing professional growth within HDPT.”

Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC has built a substantial reputation on the North Shore for providing valuable functional training and effective rehabilitative and wellness care. He is known for his comforting smile, his energetic personality, his motivating teachings and vast knowledge of and experience in exercise and sports medicine. Mr. Wilson steadily delivers a positive and gratifying experience to all of his patients. Mr. Wilson received his Physical Therapy Assistant degree from North Shore Community College in Danvers, and his Bachelor’s of Science degree in Athletic Training from Salem State University. Svet is originally from Bulgaria, but is currently a resident of Melrose, MA.

Dr. Christine Cunha imparts her kindhearted and genuine personality on each and every patient. She is known for her nurturing, attentive, forbearing and thoughtful rehabilitative treatment style. Christine’s patients are instantly comforted by her soothing and compassionate nature, all while receiving leading-edge physical therapy care. Dr. Cunha continually produces valued, comprehensive and rewarding therapeutic outcomes. Christine received her Bachelor’s of Science degree in Biology from Northeastern University, as well as her Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree. She is originally from Lexington, MA, but is currently a resident of Salem, MA.